Argentina

What’s That Gourd? An Introduction to Yerba Mate

Posted by on January 28th, 2013
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My first experiences in Argentina, Paraguay and Uruguay all involved mate… In Argentina the guy who sold me my bus ticket from Puerto Iguazú to Córdoba was drinking some strange green substance from a sawn off plastic flask, but my Spanish was at that stage not sufficient to ask anything of it. I had to […]

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People actually live in Patagonia: the films of Carlos Sorín

Posted by on December 11th, 2012
la_ventana_p patagonia tours vaya adventures 2

Patagonia, especially the wide coastal plateau on the Argentine side, is not all staggering rock faces, glistening glaciers and abundant forests. On the contrary, there are enormous swatches of it which wouldn’t even come close to making it into a tourist brochure. These parts of Patagonia have always been desolate but in the 21st century, […]

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The Estancias of Argentine Patagonia

Posted by on December 6th, 2012
Hotel Eolo

When many people picture Argentine Patagonia they envision the famous granite towers of Mt. Fitz Roy and Cerro Torre. In their eagerness to visit these stunning peaks many travelers stay in the transportation hub of El Calafate, but to do so is to miss the opportunity to experience another essential part of Patagonia: the estancia. […]

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Visiting The Life-Changing Perito Moreno Glacier

Posted by on November 27th, 2012

El Calafate, like a teenager who has just experienced a growth spurt, is awkward in its newfound popularity. Dusty, wind-chilled streets play host to the lavanderias and locutorios; pizzerias and albergos which have sprung up to cater for the throngs of tourists who come here in search of ‘the politically incorrect glacier’, the one which […]

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Asado – the Beef, not the Bull

Posted by on November 15th, 2012
asado cropped

When I arrived in Argentina I had heard about the ‘amazing steaks’, but to be honest I actually knew more about Maradona, Evita and the tango than I did about asado. A few days in the country sorted out all of those misconceptions. Granted, in Argentina Maradona is about as big as asado, but Evita is ancient history and tango is limited to Buenos […]

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Tigre and the Paraná Delta

Posted by on October 30th, 2012

For many of our travelers, the cosmopolitan allure of Buenos Aires is enough to keep them busy and satisfied for a few days.  For some, a day or two in the metropolis is enough, and they want a chance to escape the urban density and reconnect with nature.  One great day trip from Buenos Aires […]

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Argentina Reciprocity Fee 2012 Update

Posted by on September 18th, 2012

Important news for anyone flying into Buenos Aires:  Argentina has just announced that it is changing how it collects its “reciprocity fee” from U.S., Canadian and Australian visitors (it is called a “reciprocity fee” because Argentina only charges it to citizens of countries that charge a similar fee to their foreign visitors). Argentina is now going to require all […]

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Uttermost Part of the Earth: The Classic Book on Tierra del Fuego

Posted by on September 7th, 2012
Ona-Tribesmen

This extraordinary book is on our “Suggested Reading” list for Argentina, and is particularly recommended for anyone traveling to Patagonia or Tierra del Fuego. The first person account of E. Lucas Bridges (only the third child born in Tierra del Fuego to non-native parents), the book is a lesser-known classic that combines history, anthropology and adventure. […]

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Exploring the MALBA in Buenos Aires

Posted by on August 28th, 2012

One afternoon, as my husband and I explored the Palermo neighborhood of Argentina’s capital city Buenos Aires, the skies opened up, and a downpour ensued. Fortunately, it just happened to be a Wednesday, and Wednesday is a discount admission day at the MALBA Museum, so we headed on in.  It was a serendipitous event, because […]

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The Calchaqui Valley: Vineyards, Gorges & History in Northwest Argentina

Posted by on July 25th, 2012

Argentina has a long history of wine cultivation, dating back to its colonial roots.  While the production has been present for centuries, it’s within the last couple of decades that vintners have truly focused on quality over quantity.  Now the 5th largest exporter of wine in the world, including many world class producers, Argentina can […]

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